Insights

Share
  • Topic: Renewable Energy

11 matches.

  • Client Alert
    September 21, 2018

    Earlier this month, Governor Jerry Brown of California signed into law a bill that sets some of the strongest clean energy standards in the world. Senate Bill 100 requires that one hundred percent of all retail sales of electricity in California come from clean energy sources by 2045.

  • Article
    Pratt's Energy Law Report
    July 2018

    On February 9, President Trump signed into law the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 which retroactively extended some temporary tax breaks and includes some additional provisions which were left out of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. 

  • Client Alert
    May 15, 2017

    On December 7, 2016, Public Act 99-0906 was enacted into law, with an effective date of June 1, 2017. The Act calls for updates to Illinois’ Renewable Portfolio Standard, net metering, and energy efficiency standards, as well as a new zero emissions credits plan. 

  • Article
    Pratt's Energy Law Report / LexisNexis Emerging Issues Analysis
    May 2017

    The Future Energy Jobs Bill was enacted into law on December 7, 2016, as Public Act 99-0906, with an effective date of June 1, 2017. The Act calls for updates to Illinois’ renewable portfolio standards, net metering, and energy efficiency standards, as well as a new zero emissions credits plan.

  • Client Alert
    February 21, 2017

    On February 14, two federal lawsuits were filed in Illinois challenging the legality of the Zero Emissions Credits program provided for under Illinois’ recently passed Future Energy Jobs Act (Public Act 99-0906). 

  • Client Alert
    Client Alert
    May 17, 2016

    In December 2015, Congress passed the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015, which extended certain federal renewable energy tax credits for projects that began construction prior to the dates set forth in the Path Act. In response to that extension, the IRS has issued additional guidance with respect to a renewable energy facility’s eligibility to receive these tax credits.

  • Client Alert
    Client Alert
    August 19, 2014

    Under the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, qualified renewable energy generation facilities that began construction prior to January 1, 2014 are eligible to receive the renewable electricity production tax credit under section 45 of the Internal Revenue Code or, in lieu thereof, the energy investment tax credit under section 48 of the Code.

  • Chapman Insights
    Chapman Insights
    November 21, 2013

    The majority of power generated in the United States historically has been, and continues to be, generated by large-scale, centrally located generation facilities.

  • Client Alert
    Client Alert
    September 25, 2013

    Pursuant to the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, qualified facilities that begin construction before January 1, 2014 will be eligible to receive the renewable electricity production tax credit under section 45 of the Internal Revenue Code or, in lieu thereof, the energy investment tax credit under section 48 of the Code.

  • Client Alert
    Client Alert
    July 24, 2012

    The Internal Revenue Service recently released Notice 2012-44, which provides guidance concerning qualified energy conservation bonds. QECBs are taxable bonds that can be issued by state or local governments to finance certain energy conservation projects, including: (i) reducing energy consumption in publicly owned buildings by at least 20 percent; or (ii) implementing green community programs. QECBs may also be issued to finance certain electricity-producing facilities, such as wind facilities and solar facilities. 

  • Client Alert
    Client Alert
    July 18, 2012

    The Internal Revenue Service recently released Notice 2012-44, which provides guidance concerning qualified energy conservation bonds. QECBs are taxable bonds that can be issued by State or local governments to finance certain energy conservation projects, including: (i) reducing energy consumption in publicly-owned buildings by at least 20 percent; and (ii) implementing green community programs. QECBs may also be issued to finance certain electricity-producing facilities, such as wind facilities and solar facilities.